Volume 80, Number 43 | March 24 - 30, 2011
West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

Photo by William P. Steele

Are we ourselves? James Saito (Salter) and Joel de la Fuente (Bernard Two) ask some big questions about identity and destiny.

Fundraisers for friends in need

COMPILED BY SCOTT STIFFLER

ARTS FOR ALL: HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS
This cabaret benefit and silent auction sends its proceeds directly to Arts for All — a non-profit arts outreach organization providing artistic opportunities to in-need children, ages 4-19. The theme for this third annual benefit is “Home is Where the Art Is.” Through songs and scenes, Arts for All artists and a team of ten professional performers share their own personal take on what home means to them. Mixed into the songs and sketches, artists will share the work of the children served by Arts for All. Sun., April 3, 7pm. At The Kitchen (512 W. 19th St. btw. 10th and 11th Aves.). Wine and refreshments will be served. Minimum suggested donation: $25.

HIV/AIDS AWARENESS FUNDRAISER CONCERT
Video may have killed the radio star — and digital may have killed video, but disco never died. Return to those thrilling days of yesteryear at this dance event designed to celebrate classic disco-era music while raising funds for two modern classics. “Make That Feeling Come Again II: An HIV/AIDS Awareness Fundraiser Dance Event” does exactly what it says, and all for two great organizations whose causes, conveniently, are summed up within their names: GMHC (Gay Men’s Health Crisis) and AREA (The American Run For The End of AIDS). Shake your booty (which is located in the same general area as your groove thing) as DJ Michael Wilson spins. Put some more cash in the coffers when you make a bid on artwork offered as part of the Silent Auction. The sponsors: The yummy dishes at Elmo Restaurant & Lounge; the buff bunnies from Crunch; and the fine folks from Rainbows & Triangles (who carry a very fine array of Golden Girls-themed products). Sat., April 9, 9pm-2am. At Elmo Restaurant & Lounge (156 7th Ave. btw. 19th & 20th Sts.). Admission: $20. For info, call 212-580-7668. 

CONCERT TO BENEFIT JAPAN EARTHQUAKE RELIEF
Abrons Arts Center presents. John Zorn hosts. The lineup includes performances by Norah Jones, Jesse Harris, and Thurston Moore. An early and late show will feature two different sets by Ikue Mori and John Zorn, Vinicius Cantuária, Masada String Trio, Buke and Gass, Erik Friedlander and Sylvie Courvoisier, JACK Quartet, Elysian Fields, and many more. Surprise guest artists are to be announced. Normally, this would be reason enough to show up — but on top of that, 100% of the proceeds will be donated to support Japan Society’s Earthquake Relief Fund. “The tragedy and devastation is really overwhelming,” says John Zorn — who is organizing the proceedings and will host the evening. “I’ve always felt a strong personal connection to Japan, and I’m just glad to be able to do my part to help. It should be an amazing night.” Fri., April 8, 6:30pm and 9:30pm shows. At Abrons Arts Center (466 Grand St. at Pitt). $35 Balcony seating; $50 Orchestra seating. Tickets available at abronsartscenter.org and theatermania.com.

CONCERT FOR JAPAN
The “Concert for Japan” offers 12 hours of music and special activities — all for the benefit of Japan Society’s Japan Earthquake Relief Fund. All proceeds and tax-deductible contributions made on site will go to organizations that directly help victims recover from the devastating effects of the earthquake and tsunamis that struck Japan on March 11.  Lou Reed, Laurie Anderson, and NY-based Japanese female-led bands Echostream, Hard Nips, The Suzan and Me & Mars are among those who will perform. The event will also offer many events and activities originally slated as part of “j-CATION: Beyond Cute” — the second annual daylong open house festival previously announced for Sat., April 9. Those activities include making origami cranes and washi lanterns for good wishes and recovery, basic Japanese language lessons and unlimited access to “Bye Bye Kitty!!! Between Heaven & Hell in Contemporary Japanese Art” — Japan Society’s current gallery exhibition.

Sat., April 9 from 11am-11pm at Japan Society (333 E. 47th St. btw. First & Second Aves.) All proceeds go to the Japan Earthquake Relief Fund. Can’t make it to this event? Japan Society will give half of all ticket and admission sales made through June 30 from all events to the fund. To donate, go to japansociety.org/earthquake — or send a check to Japan Society, 333 East 47th Street, New York, New York 10017; Attn: Japan Earthquake Relief Fund. Checks should be made payable to Japan Society and indicate “Japan Earthquake Relief Fund.” For a full roster of performers and a schedule, call 212-832-1155 or visit japansociety.org/concertforjapan.

GALA CABARET BENEFIT FOR NEW ALTERNATIVES
Established in 2008, New Alternatives helps foster self-sufficiency among New York’s homeless LGBT youth. Executive Director Kate Barnhart, formerly of Sylvia’s Place, has dedicated her life to this cause. Now, four cabaret performers dedicate themselves to blowing the roof off of The Metropolitan Room in order to bring some cash to the worthy New Alternatives coffers. Natalie Douglas, Terese Genecco, Kim Smith and Rick Skye’s Slice o’ Minnelli perform. Journalist and performer Kevin Scott Hall hosts. You? Well, you pony up some cash, drink, snap your fingers and swoon — and you can do that, right? Mon., March 28, 7pm. At The Metropolitan Room (34 W. 22nd St.). For tickets ($25 plus two-drink minimum), call 212-206-0440 or visit metropolitanroom.com. Also visit newalternativesnyc.org.

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