Volume 79, Number 41 | March 17 - 23, 2010
West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933


The A-List

Compiled By Scott Stiffler

THEATER

PAUL ROBESON PROJECT
Actor, athlete, lawyer, singer and activist Paul Robeson is not exactly a household name. Despite the occasional documentary, Robeson’s contributions have been largely ignored by (or erased from) history. This lecture demonstration means to rectify that injustice by highlighting the achievements and the human flaws of a man whose age of influence and notoriety occurred smack dab in the midst of Jim Crow and McCarthyism. Adding another layer onto the evening is the genderfuck casting of Kim Howard as Robeson — a move which makes sense considering the venue. March 18-21 and 25-28 (Thurs.-Sat, 8 p.m.; Sun, 2 p.m.). At W.O.W. Theatre Café (59-61 E4th St., 4th Fl.; Btw. Bowery and 2nd Ave.). For tickets ($15), call 212-777-4280.   

COMEDY

SWEET PAPRIKA
Like the misunderstood spice which inspired their name, “Sweet Paprika” is a comedy event meant for those whose tastes gravitate towards the unique and unexpected. Your easy-on-the-eyes, tough-on-the-ribs hosts (Allison Castillo and Ophira Eisenberg) are joined by Jeffrey Cubeta on the piano — as well as battle-tested (but not quite world-weary) comics such as Giulia Rozzi, Michael Terry and Brad Loekle. As if that’s not enough, the show ends with a closing Musical Extravaganza! March 25th; doors at 9:30 p.m. ($10, two-drink minimum); at D-Lounge (101 E 15th St. at Union Square East, beneath The Daryl Roth Theatre ).

THEATER

OUT OF THE ENSEMBLE
Comix is that comedy club on West 14 Street which is positioning itself to be about more than stand-ups and jokes. This new cabaret series (“Out of the Ensemble”), features performers from current and past Broadway shows and national tours. In other words, they’re battle-tested crooners who — like the comics usually found onstage at Comix) — know how to work a crowd and get an emotional response. This month’s installment features the likes of Erica Mansfield (“A Chorus Line” Broadway National Tour), Jessica Stewart (“Fiddler on the Roof” at The Village Light Opera) and Dennis Stowe (“Shrek the Musical”). By the time they’re done, you’ll have gained a newfound appreciation for the unsung heroes of Broadway: members of the ensemble. March 23, 8:00 p.m. (doors open at 7:00 p.m.); at Comix’s Copper Room (353 W 14th St. at 9th Ave.). $5 cover. For info, call 212-524-2500 or visit www.outoftheensemble.com.

Action packed: 16 of the 25-member cast

THE RING
Hudson Guild Theatre Company’s latest project is an ambitious one. “The Ring” is an appropriate-for-all-ages play adapted from Richard Wagner’s 15-hour epic opera “The Ring of the Nibelung.” HGTC has cut it to a mere 90 minutes — and packed the stage with a company of 25 actors ranging in age from 9 to 75. The result, we’re assured, is an action-packed interpretation of the trippy classic — complete with orchestral excerpts from Wagner’s score and a full plate of gods, monsters, and mysterious happenings. Perhaps most bizarre is the price of admission: Pay What You Can. Try getting that deal the next time you go to the “legitimate” opera! At Hudson Guild Theatre (441 West 26th St., btw. 9th and 10th Aves.). March 19 (8 p.m.); March 20 (2 p.m.); March 21 (3 p.m.); March 26 (8 p.m.); March 27 (2 & 8 p.m.); March 28 (3 p.m.). For reservations, call 212-760-9817.

AUGUST WILSON’S WOMEN
By the time August Wilson left us in 2005, he had crafted an enduring legacy — a series of 10 plays chronicling the African-American experience for each decade of the 20th century (among them, “Joe Turner’s Come and Gone” and “Fences”). This production focuses on the playwright’s vital (but often overshadowed) female characters. Juneteenth Legacy Theatre gives “August Wilson’s Women” their due by presenting a series of excerpts from the playwright’s work. Among the characters are Aunt Ester (“The Gem of The Ocean”) — who uses her special knowledge to point others in the direction they need to go; Ma Rainey (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”) — a successful singer; and Rose (“Fences”) — a loving wife who equates family and loyalty with sacrifice. Thurs. through Sat, 7:00 p.m.; March 25th through April 10th. At Nuyorican Poets Café (236 East 3rd St., btw. Avenues B and C). Tickets are $20.00 ($15 for students/seniors). To purchase, call 212-780-9386 or visit www.nuyorican.org. Also visit www.juneteenthlegacytheatre.com.

 

 

 

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