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Editorial

Can’t deny Occupy
The Occupy Wall Street movement, which officially began on Sept. 17 in Zuccotti Park and has since captured the eye of the country and the world, is picking up steam with each passing day.


Scoopy's Notebook

Letters to the Editor

Police Blotter

Evan Forsch

BY FLY

In Pictures

BOB ARIHOOD: From kisses to can attacks

Bikers make a splash for public space — in fountains!

SCENE

Faith Occupies Wall Street

Talking Point

Can Hudson Square handle a major rezoning by Trinity?

The voice of the turtledove: It’s really overdue
By DANIEL MELTZER
Occupy Wall Street is neither an occupation nor is it on Wall Street (the Street being too sacred a place for the People to assemble). It is a state of mind, and a statement of disgust and rejection of the status quo in these United States of America, which are arguably less united today than at any time since the Civil War. If the scene at Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan is disorderly, it is because the superficial orderliness that surrounds it in the canyons of power that are the Financial District, is as false as the phony storefronts on a Hollywood set.

ARTS

Stop it, you’re scaring me
BY SCOTT STIFFLER
Horrifying Halloween events worth embracing.

New York School: Back in session
BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN
At Cheim & Read, Resnick endures.

What’s up on the High Line

Lully and Mahler launch the season

Just Do Art!

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Photo by Tequila Minsky

Time to change the tune
Tuesday, Occupy Wall Street protesters picketed homes of Upper East Side millionaires, including Rupert Murdoch, David Koch and Howard Milstein. The demonstrators decried the fact that rich New Yorkers will benefit from the imminent expiration of the state’s “Millionaires’ Tax.” Saturday, they were at Washington Square. See article.


Probe has parents angry, principal in ‘rubber room’
By ALINE REYNOLDS
One of the city’s top-rated schools, located on the Lower East Side, continues to be under intense scrutiny by the city Department of Education for financial improprieties.

N.Y.U. and New School students walk out, join march

‘There is panic’; School rezoning comes as shock

A New Yorker goes nomadic
BY BOB KRASNER
A few weeks ago, Ed Casabian was living in the East Village. It’s his favorite part of Manhattan, partly due to the fact that it has “some of the best restaurants in the city.” Seventh St. between First Ave. and Avenue A is his favorite food block. Caracas Arepa Bar, Pylos and Luke’s Lobster are a few of the places that top his list. 

Chinatown, Little Italy unite to preserve, promote

S.U.V. driver arrested after assaulting pedestrian

More L trains...pretty soon

Take a shot: Free flu clinic

Breath of fresh air for gardens


Rudin now owns St. Vincent’s site, brings in partner
By ALBERT AMATEAU
Members of Community Board 2’s St. Vincent’s Omnibus Committee last week considered how to officially respond to the Rudin Organization’s proposal for the residential redevelopment of the former hospital’s main campus in Greenwich Village.

Riis leaks are driving NYCHA tenants up the wall

CLAYTON'S PAGE
Volume I: Religion, schools, bruisers, pols and food


Bob held up a mirror and showed the community to itself

Memorial Mass for blogger Bob Arihood


OBITUARIES

Penny Chaipis, 72, actress and Tribeca travel agent

Bill Costa, Xavier J.V. football coach


10TH ANNIVERSARY


What my kids said to me is what I’ll remember most
By JOHN W. SUTTER
At the end of the day, what happened on Sept. 11, 2001, is a personal experience for everyone.

From the ruins, damaged beauty
BY ALINE REYNOLDS
Exploring catastrophe, before and after 9/11.

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The Art of Remembrance
9/11 observed through dance, music, theater, art

9/11 examined, through art

Do we have fortitude to keep up war against terror?
By ED KOCH
In his address to Congress after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said it was “a date which will live in infamy.” Nine Eleven is likewise a date that will live in infamy.

Artists bear witness to the rebirth of W.T.C. site
By GERARD FLYNN
On the 48th floor of Seven World Trade Center, a group of artists have taken on the daunting challenge of documenting the reconstruction of Ground Zero in its many forms and through many different media since the 52-story building was completed in 2006.

Former MVP hoopster’s team wins one for the Zipper
By LINCOLN ANDERSON and TEQUILA MINSKY
On Mon., Aug. 22, the Stephen Mulderry Men’s Unlimited League held its championship game at the Hamilton Fish basketball court on the Lower East Side. The tournament’s namesake was a 33-year-old equities trader and top player in the league who died in the World Trade Center attack.

On the ground at the Trade Center as Towers fell
By CLAYTON PATTERSON
Remembering 9/11 is like viewing an avant-garde filmstrip with several deleted frames. Some images are absolutely clear but there is no continuity of information or connection to what happened before or what came next.

Will he remember? Trade Center was his playground
By AMY DELLASALA
“Hey Mom, what was the World Trade Center?”

 


OF SEPTEMBER 11


The Tiles

Memorial has become
the ‘Heart of the Village’

Mighty Twin Towers are laid low on a day of infamy

Disaster on an epic scale: ‘It looked like a movie’

Cheering the rescue workers: My month on the median
By KATE WALTER
I saw summer turn to fall on the median of the West Side Highway where I stood waving my American flag, holding up handmade thank-you signs, saluting the rescue and recovery workers. 

Healing at Union Square

Losing the Towers, losing our sense of security in New York
By JERRY TALLMER
Oh, it’s a long, long while from May to December. But the days grow short when you reach September.

I left Jane St., but that day will always be with me
By PATRICIA FIELDSTEEL
NYONS, France — A perfect Provençal morning. That was how I thought of it, then.

Snapshots of lives cut short

Haunting my youth — from Pakistan to Ground Zero
By MUNEEZA IQBAL
I sat in front of the television doing my homework. It was around five in the evening and I was startled to hear my dad’s voice as he marched up the stairs, hours before he usually came home from work.

After 9/11, learning to love cops and wave the flag

Former firefighter recalls the ‘Miracle of Stairwell B’
By GERARD FLYNN
In his studio apartment not far from Ground Zero, retired Firefighter Mickey Kross recently demonstrated what he did the morning the North Tower collapsed on Sept. 11, 2001, at 10:28 a.m.

 


The Villager is published by Community Media LLC. 515 Canal Street, New York, NY 10013
Phone: (212) 229-1890 | Fax: (212) 229-2790 | Advertising: 646-452-2496 | © 2011 Community Media, LLC

Volume 81, Number 19 | October 13 - 19, 2011
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