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Volume 76, Number 3
June 7 - 13, 2006


Editorial/ Op-Ed
Time for Basketball City to stop playing games with Pier 63
Like a scrappy basketball team that never says die, Basketball City is refusing to throw in the towel at Pier 63 in the Hudson River Park. Yet, it’s clear that the game is over and that Basketball City must vacate the Chelsea pier so that a long-awaited, open, free public park can be built there.

Villager photo by Q. Sakamaki
West Point pride
At the U.S. Military Academy’s commencement at Michie Stadium in West Point on May 27, newly commissioned second lieutenants celebrated and hugged each other after receiving their diplomas. President Bush addressed the graduating cadets at the ceremony.

Talking Point
The battle of Washington Square: Why we’re fighting
By Jonathan Greenberg
My only discussion with Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe occurred last September under an event tent in Washington Square Park. In a polite conversation, I told him how many Villagers felt that the park’s sunken central plaza is the center of our community, and the most colorful and diverse public gathering space in New York. Transforming it into a street-level pedestrian pass-through mall, I said, could destroy the heart of our beloved park.


Letters to the editor

Scoopy's Notebook

Editorial Cartoon
By Ira Blutreich

Police blotter

News In Brief

Chalk another one up for sidewalk art

Beetlemania


Picture Story

Park-pourri of delicious foods
The fourth annual Taste of the Village saw 400 people spend two hours last Thursday sampling gourmet specialties under a big white tent in Washington Square Park.


Youth/Sports

Mighty Boomer at the bat: There’s joy in Orioleville
BY JUDITH STILES
AND WILLIAM SANTORE
When young Dave Heffernan’s booming voice called out the batting order, even the snoozing fans perked up and listened at the start of Sunday’s Greenwich Village Little League game in the Majors A Division. Heff seized everyone’s attention as his unstoppable enthusiasm charged the air with the cold hard fact that the winner of this Majors A game between his beloved Orioles and the Red Sox would advance toward the finals, and the loser would go home. This was not just another day in G.V.L.L. baseball.


Village People
Filmmaker Robert Edwards’ Double Vision
By Bonnie Rosenstock
When Robert Edwards wrote the movie script for “Land of the Blind” in early 2001, the world as we now know it occupied a very different landscape. What Edwards envisioned as a universal discourse on revolutionary ideals gone awry, religious fanaticism, terrorism and the power of memory has proven to be visionary and as timely as tomorrow’s headlinesZz
"Serving West and East Village, Chelsea, SoHo, NoHo, Little Italy, Chinatown and the Lower East Side"


Villager photo by Jefferson Siegel

Councilmember Rosie Mendez on Tuesday announcing her introduction of legislation to ban use of exotic animals in live performances in New York City.

Mendez cracks whip on use of wild animals in circuses
By David Spett
With support from animal-rights organizations, Councilmember Rosie Mendez introduced a bill Tuesday to ban wild animal acts from the circus, a move Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey said would force them to stop all of their New York City performances.

NEWS

Wealthy ‘angel’ offers salvation for St. Brigid’s Church on Ave. B
By Albert Amateau
Just before an Appellate Division hearing seeking to stop the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York from demolishing St. Brigid’s Church on Avenue B, an “angel” announced through a lawyer that he wanted to buy the 1849 structure “at a fair market price intending to restore it and use it for nonprofit purposes.”

Sushi Samba slips landmarks net for 5 years, maybe is caught
By Janet Kwon
Coils of ivylike plants wind their way in and out of a wooden trellis fashioned to create a makeshift ceiling. Everything from the barstools to the menus fits the color scheme of burnt orange, sage and pea green with splashes of mustard yellow.


INSIDE
Real Food Markets take root in Greenmarket’s turf
By Janet Kwon
It’s not Green, it’s Real — Real Food Markets, that is. While similar, they’re not quite the same. But what they do share in common is that they provide fresh regional food to New Yorkers.

Xavier alumnus gives $5 million to build new, high-tech auditorium
In the largest single gift in Xavier High School’s 160-year history, Miguel (Mike) B. Fernandez, a Florida-based healthcare industry entrepreneur and alumnus of Xavier’s class of 1972, has pledged a $5 million donation to the Jesuit preparatory school for boys on W. 16th St.

No one wants to be defeated’ in restaurant rumble
By Lincoln Anderson
Bob Giraldi remembers when he was directing the music video for Michael Jackson’s “Beat It.” It had been Jackson’s idea to do the video with real Bloods and Crips, and as the rival gang members stood facing off in the studio, things began to get tense, to say the least. Giraldi decided that to defuse things, he would do the dance number on the first day, instead of on the second day, as originally planned.

Underage sales, after-hours violation close Falls
By Jefferson Siegel
Last Friday afternoon police descended on The Falls, the now-notorious Lafayette St. bar where John Jay student Imette St. Guillen was last seen alive in February before she was murdered.

Committee members defied V.I.D., backed Hillary
By Lincoln Anderson
When the Village Independent Democrats voted last month to overwhelmingly endorse Jonathan Tasini over Hillary Clinton for U.S. Senator, they felt confident that their two state committee members, Larry Moss and Rachel Lavine, would back Tasini at the recent Democratic State Convention in Buffalo. But that wasn’t exactly how things turned out.

3 elementary schools try to patch over feud with patchwork mandalas
By Anindita Dasgupta
After a year of high tensions and fighting among parents, students from Public Schools 134, 137 and 184M came together over large circular canvases, oil pastels, fuzzy pompoms, pipe cleaners and mounds of glitter.



Gay Pride A special Villager supplement
Pier kids tell critics: ‘Back off, this is our place’
By John Koblin
Despite the debate over gay youth in the Village that caused teeth gnashing earlier this year, plus an unseasonably chilly June night, queer boys and girls, spanning the city’s five boroughs, were proudly sashaying and strutting to the Christopher St. pier in numbers last weekend.

Thompson to honor six at center

On being Captain Lou’s first real live gay person
By Kate Walter
Captain Lou picked me up at the Bay Head train station on a hot summer day.
I was the writer from Manhattan coming to the Jersey Shore to interview a forensic marine investigator. When we went to the Ocean Bay Diner for lunch, I was shocked

Village AIDS memorial is in need of financial aid
By Janet Kwon
Although progress has been slow since the project’s inception, plans for an AIDS monument at Bank St. in Hudson River Park are picking up speed as the AIDS Monument Committee acquires welcome financial support.
Trying to understand my, our, love affair with Judy Garland
By Jerry Tallmer
In a hotel room high over Central Park South, George Cukor stopped dead in his tracks. He stared out and down through a picture window overlooking the park.

Quinn’s food for thought
Among the issues Christine Quinn has made her priorities since being elected the first openly lesbian speaker of the City Council earlier this year is eliminating child hunger in the city.
Same-sex couples find

sanctuary at Middle Collegiate
By Jefferson Siegel
Can love be legislated?
It’s a centuries-old conundrum, rife with religious edicts, contradictory laws and ingrained traditions. While the current administration in Washington eschews scientific fact for evolutionary theory, it attempts to mandate that biology trump emotion and affection.

Pucks, yucks, Buds, Babs and dancing on the pier
After quarter century of AIDS, gains but new threats
By Anindita Dasgupta
Twenty-five years since the onset of the AIDS pandemic, many gains have been made in combating the disease. Yet, the struggle is hardly over.

Marriage, ‘the gay agenda’ and Mr. Straight Man
By Tim Gay
The topic on the Chelsea Reform Democratic Club’s Yahoo group was Howard Dean’s flip on gay marriage. And the straight man was adamant.

No pressure on the pier

On being Captain Lou’s first real live gay person
By Kate Walter
Captain Lou picked me up at the Bay Head train station on a hot summer day. I was the writer from Manhattan coming to the Jersey Shore to interview a forensic marine investigator. 

Arts & Entertainment



Poet in a cage, long before Guantánamo
By Jerry Tallmer
In the opening moments of a play called “Treason,” the poet Ezra Pound, dressed flamboyantly in cape, sombrero, flowing cravat, and ruffled shirt, speaks into a microphone at a broadcast studio in Rome in 1941. “Kike Rosenfelt,” he exclaims, “that snotty barbarian … If ever a nation produced efficient democracy it has been in Germany … Eliminate Roosevelt and his Jews, or the Jews and their Roosevelt … ”

Mimi Stern-Wolfe, unsung musical heroine
By Michael Clive
Few cultural clichés are more durable or romantic than the musician making sacrifices for art. The movies show him shivering in a Parisian garret with soot-rimmed skylights. But in real life, the setting is a cramped two-bedroom on the Lower East Side stacked with cartons of files, recordings and annotated scores. And the musician is a woman – pianist-conductor-teacher-impresariat Mimi Stern-Wolfe – who has been making beautiful music happen Downtown for more than 30 years.

Filmmaker Robert Edwards’ Double Vision
By Bonnie Rosenstock
When Robert Edwards wrote the movie script for “Land of the Blind” in early 2001, the world as we now know it occupied a very different landscape. What Edwards envisioned as a universal discourse on revolutionary ideals gone awry, religious fanaticism, terrorism and the power of memory has proven to be visionary and as timely as tomorrow’s headlines

Koch On Film
By Ed Koch
La Tropical (+) At the open-air dance hall, La Tropical, located on the outskirts of Havana, 200 to 4,000 people, mostly blacks, regularly dance the night away. While the camera focuses on the dancers and musicians, interviews are conducted with some of the patrons.
District B13 (+) This sparkling, violent French film is worth seeing. It is a searing attack on French society, based in part on the rioting that recently took place in the ring of low-income housing units around Paris that are overwhelmingly occupied by Arabs and Africans.

Albert Watson’s omnivorous lens
By Aileen Torres
Though his name may not be as familiar as Richard Avedon’s or Irving Penn’s, Scottish-born photographer Albert Watson is highly renowned in his industry, particularly for his work in fashion. Named one of the 20 most influential photographers of all time by Photo District News magazine, the West Village resident now has his first solo show in New York at 401 Projects, a new gallery space and community center for photographers just a few blocks from Watson’s own studio.

Hudson River Park rocks pier with free summer concert series



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