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From politicians to punks, people love The Villager!

From politicians to punks, people love The Villager!

The Villager is one of our city’s crown jewels. Its hyperlocal news and arts coverage and independent-minded editorials are an antidote to a lot of the homogenized media elsewhere in New York. And where would any of us be without a weekly dose of Scoopy’s? Brad Hoylman State senator, former chairperson of Community Board 2 I read more here »

Join in! Tradition continues with a new look

BY JENNIFER GOODSTEIN  |  The more things change, the more they stay the same. A well-worn phrase, but one that rings true as we celebrate The Villager’s 80th anniversary. Combing through the newspaper’s archives, we see headlines from the past eight decades that could be ripped from today’s paper. The Villager has reported on world-class read more here »

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Looking back at 80 years of coverage

’30s 1933: The Villager is born with a “guaranteed circulation of 25,000.” An early issue is the spotty service on “Sixth Ave. surface line,” apparently streetcars, and the slacker drivers who only want to get back to “the barn.” 1934: Getting dangerous trains off of 10th Ave., the High Line, a new elevated freight railway, opens. read more here »

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An editor’s notebook: Looking (and moving) east, AIDS, Off Broadway plays, awards and ‘going daily’

BY MICHAEL A. ARMSTRONG   |  Newspapers are living things and those who love them measure success by endurance. Over 80 years, through cultural, political and economic upheavals in its community — not to mention the leadership of a few dozen different editors and publishers over the decades — The Villager continues to be an read more here »

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Cover illustrator Caswell kept ‘close to the ground’

BY SUZAN MAZUR  |  “It was an ant with a crumb twice its size in its jaws slowly making its way over the twigs. It occurred to me that if I was that little ant, the shrubbery would look like a great forest, and so with my face close to the ground, I tried to read more here »

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We won the battle for the square, but now are we at risk of losing it again?

BY CAROL GREITZER  |  Well, we’re all getting older. But while some of us gripe with our peers about our ailments, the newest octogenarian, The Villager, keeps going, as sprightly and energetic as ever. For this article, The Villager asked me about cars parked in Washington Square Park. I don’t remember such parking, though, of read more here »

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Taking over The Villager was  a dream come true for us both

BY ELIZABETH MARGARITIS BUTSON  |  When The Villager was founded in 1933, during the Great Depression, it promised to be an independent voice in the community. The Villager has an impressive track record.  It is well and alive and winning top journalism awards. The past 50 years have been challenging to the newspaper business. Many read more here »

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Inside the infamous House of D: Where today a lush garden blooms, a sad women’s prison once loomed

BY REED IDE  |  M ost people living in Greenwich Village have no idea that just a few short decades ago a 12-story fortress-like prison for women dominated the skyline and the ambience of the neighborhood’s heart. Massive in its architecture, the prison controlled the street life around it. Women in their cells would sit near read more here »

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Tried to make a go of running paper, but it was tough

BY ROYCE ROWE  |  I  guess I can take credit, or blame, for saving The Villager from extinction. I bought the paper in about 1973 or 1974 from owners Ed McDougall and Jack Raymond. Ed was an executive at the American Banker magazine, and Jack was a former New York Times reporter who had gone read more here »

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Through changes, Bryans’ baby is still going strong

BY ALBERT AMATEAU  |  The Villager began 80 years ago on April 13, 1933, four years after Wall St. crashed and a few years into the Great Depression. Through the lean years and the New Deal, through the years of World War II, the weekly newspaper chronicled the struggle to save The Village and Washington read more here »

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