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A Downtown champion

There might be people who love Lower Manhattan as much as Liz Berger did, but we doubt anyone loved it more. Berger had an enthusiasm for Downtown that was infectious, and her dedication to our community made it a better place to live and work. Like many others, we were saddened to learn of her read more here »

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Amen for acceptance

“Who am I to judge?” Those simple words said so much. Ever since Pope Francis became leader of the Catholic Church in March, it was clear that, unlike his predecessor, he would be a unifying figure with a message to be embraced, not just by Catholics, but also by many people of all faiths and read more here »

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Some summer reading

We’re proud, in this week’s issue, to unveil our first installment of V Lit, a new special supplement to The Villager and the East Villager newspapers. Why did we do it? For starters, amid the never-ending pressures of the news cycle, a number of author interviews and book reviews we had done were starting to read more here »

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The Trayvon verdict

Amid the ongoing concern about racial profiling in America, last Saturday evening’s verdict in the Trayvon Martin killing came as stunning news. Protests erupted across the country, with the one Sunday in Times Square reportedly having been the largest of all. At Middle Collegiate Church in the East Village, worshipers this past Sunday, once again read more here »

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Uniting the two Americas

Four years after launching federal litigation against Proposition 8, Chad Griffin, now president of the Human Rights Campaign, has reason to be happy. His hope of settling the question of a federal constitutional right to same-sex marriage fell short, for now, but marriage equality has been restored to California and, due to victory in the read more here »

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Edie’s victory, our progress

It was in the late winter of 2004 when I met Edie Windsor and the woman she would marry several years later in Toronto, Thea Spyer. A couple of weeks before, Gavin Newsom, then mayor of San Francisco, declared that city had the authority to marry same-sex couples. Relying on a legal argument that nothing read more here »

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Out of thin air

Everyone, or almost everyone, was taken off guard last week, when the State Legislature approved a series of major changes to the 1998 Hudson River Park Act. The most significant of these allows the park to sell its unused air rights for development one block inland. According to the Hudson River Park Trust, the park read more here »

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Conservancy concerns

This Thursday evening June 20, Community Board 2 may — or may not — vote on whether or not to recommend approval of a new conservancy for Washington Square Park. We have no issues with a private, nonprofit group raising funds for the park. Indeed, there are already groups that do so, such as the read more here »

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Fighting future Sandys

If you go all the way back to 1900, three of the 10 worst storms to hit the Battery occurred after 2009. That’s one of the more staggering things revealed in the Bloomberg administration’s comprehensive analysis of the growing threats from climate change. The most memorable — and overwhelmingly the largest of the 10 storms — read more here »

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Pitting bikes vs. art

Well, bike-share is off and rolling in New York City, and as of this past weekend, the new program is now open to users on a daily and weekly basis, as opposed to annual membership. The Citi Bikes are pretty much everywhere. Every tenth cycle or so whizzing by on the Hudson River Park bikeway, read more here »

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