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De Blasio wins; Voters lose with shoddy ballots

The big news this Election Day was of course Bill de Blasio’s resounding victory over Joe Lhota in the mayor’s race. Three out of four voters picked de Blasio in what is clearly an overwhelming mandate for his progressive agenda for a city that “leaves no one behind.” Some voters admitted they would be surprised read more here »

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Being prepared for the hurricane next time

It’s hard to believe that a year ago, we were in the throes of the post-Superstorm Sandy blackout. There was no electricity or heat, many residents lacked elevator service and running water — even cold water — flushable toilets, and, just our luck, it was starting to get raw and cold. We survived, but it took read more here »

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The Villager endorses de Blasio for mayor

Many Downtown voters could still smell the 9/11 fires 12 years ago — the last time New Yorkers were certain they would be getting a new mayor. Today, the odor is a distant memory to some, a vivid one to others. But many who will be voting for the city’s next leader on Nov. 5 read more here »

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Times and tech change, but The Villager’s still here

BY LINCOLN ANDERSON  |  In an age of shrinking print media, community weeklies are still holding their own. Especially now, it’s important to be a known entity, and The Villager definitely is one. The Villager has a tremendous 80-year tradition of community journalism, which we have endeavored to highlight in this week’s special anniversary section read more here »

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Give us Liberty; End the shutdown

In Lower Manhattan the mobs of tourists are no longer coming to spend their money before and after seeing the Statue of Liberty. The African Burial Ground is closed. So is Federal Hall where George Washington was sworn into office — and his namesake city, our nation’s capital, has reached unprecedented levels of dysfunction. The closed read more here »

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Get rid of runoffs

Two qualified candidates for public advocate faced off in a runoff  Tuesday, with Councilmember Letitia James defeating state Senator Daniel Squadron. The turnout was extremely low — only 187,000 of the party’s 3 million registered Democrats went to the polls. Meanwhile, the cost of the city’s running the runoff, $13 million, far exceeds the small read more here »

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Vote Squadron on Oct. 1

Sit back registered Democrats and wait until November to vote again — that is unless you care about who becomes mayor of New York City. Abysmal turnout is expected for the runoff Tues., Oct. 1, to pick the Democratic candidate for public advocate. Without a Republican in the race, the Democratic nominee is all but read more here »

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Why Quinn hit the wall

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn began this year as the prohibitive frontrunner in the Democratic mayoral race. Now, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio goes into the general election without needing to first dispatch his runner-up. Quinn finished up on primary night with just 15.5 percent of the vote, having lost her own Village / Chelsea read more here »

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Fixing how we vote

Democracy, as the saying goes, is the worst form of government except for all of the others.  Along those lines, New York’s creaky voting-machine system is the worst voting except for the “modern” electronic vote scanners the state picked a few years ago. That one’s technology is so cutting edge that it was impossible to read more here »

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Mendez, Squadron, Stringer

Rosie Mendez, who has represented City Council District 2, covering the East Village, part of the Lower East Side, Gramercy, Kip’s Bay and Murray Hill, since 2006, faces a primary challenge from Richard Del Rio, a senior pastor at Abounding Grace Church in the East Village. A strong voice for affordable housing and tenants’ rights, Mendez read more here »

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