Just Do Art, Nov. 21, 2013

Sure to inspire: A dance performance, from last year’s Third Street Music School holiday concert. This year’s Dec. 7 concert kicks off celebrations for the school’s 120th year.  PHOTO BY IVAN ANTONOV

Sure to inspire: A dance performance, from last year’s Third Street Music School holiday concert. This year’s Dec. 7 concert kicks off celebrations for the school’s 120th year. PHOTO BY IVAN ANTONOV

THIRD STREET MUSIC SCHOOL’S HOLIDAY CONCERT
Located on in the heart of the East Village, Third Street Music School Settlement’s early childhood programs are good for the soul — but not exactly inexpensive to maintain, or provide (more than 75% of students receive financial aid or participate in tuition-free instruction and low-cost enrichment programs). Founded in 1894, the school will be celebrating its 120th year throughout 2014 with a citywide program of special events. Their upcoming holiday concert, which officially kick-starts the anniversary observances, serves to raise funds for the worthy nonprofit while showcasing a variety of musical and dance groups whose high bar of excellence will inspire Third Street’s students and patrons alike. Graham Parker, General Manager and Vice President of WQXR, hosts the event. In addition to jazz, tap and piano ensembles, there will be performances from the Glee Choir, the Let’s All Sing Choir and the Chorale Choir as well as the Philharmonia, Con Spirito and Sinfonia Orchestras.

Sat., Dec. 7, at 1-4pm. At the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts (566 LaGuardia Place, just south of Washington Square Park). Purchase tickets ($10) at the box office (Tues.-Sat., noon-6pm) or by calling 866-811-4111 or visiting nyuskirball.org/calendar/thirdstreet. For all things Third Street, visit thirdstreetmusicschool.org.

Jan Tichy’s “Recess” (2009, High-definition digital video projection) is part of the “Politics of Light” solo exhibition, on view through Dec. 14 at No Longer Empty.  IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Jan Tichy’s “Recess” (2009, High-definition digital video projection) is part of the “Politics of Light” solo exhibition, on view through Dec. 14 at No Longer Empty. IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

JAN TICHY: POLITCS OF LIGHT
Richard Gray Gallery and No Longer Empty (the folks who fill unoccupied storefronts with art) are presenting this solo exhibition of Israeli artist Jan Tichy’s instillations. Featuring single-channel videos, digital light/sculpture installations and site-specific work, “Politics of Light” casts a social, political and visual ray of clarity on “the seen and the unseen” world. “Politics” also distinguishes itself as the inaugural exhibition of NLE Presents — No Longer Empty’s new series dedicated to in-depth presentations of solo artists.

Free. Through Dec. 14, at No Longer Empty (196 Stanton St., at Attorney St.). Hours: Wed.-Sat., 2-7pm (closed Thanksgiving weekend). For more info, visit richardgraygallery.com and nolongerempty.com.

Another building saved by a fireman’s camera: This shot of Engine Co. No. 31’s former Lafayette St. quarters is part of the “Historic Firehouses of Manhattan” photo exhibit, on view through Dec. 8 at the NYC Fire Museum.  PHOTO BY WAI NG

Another building saved by a fireman’s camera: This shot of Engine Co. No. 31’s former Lafayette St. quarters is part of the “Historic Firehouses of Manhattan” photo exhibit, on view through Dec. 8 at the NYC Fire Museum. PHOTO BY WAI NG

PHOTO EXHIBIT: HISTORIC FIREHOUSES  OF MANHATTAN
What does it say about a man who spends his entire career on call to run towards danger, only to occupy his “golden years” by preserving buildings in a manner that flames can’t touch? New York’s Bravest never punch the clock, apparently. They just find a new outlet for that drive to save things. When gold watch time came for FDNY Lieutenant Stephen Healy, he shifted his focus to capturing the architectural beauty of Manhattan firehouses built from the 1800s to the early 1900s. Healy’s “Historic Firehouses of Manhattan” is a photo series on exhibit through early December, at the New York City Fire Museum — an appropriate host venue on many levels, given that the museum occupies a renovated 1904 Beaux-Arts building that was once home to Engine Company No. 30, and now houses a renowned collection of fire-related artifacts from the 18th century to the present (including hand-pumped fire engines, horse-drawn vehicles and all manner of tools and equipment).

Nov. 22-Dec. 8. At the New York City Fire Museum (278 Spring St., btw. Hudson & Varick Sts.). Open daily, 10am-5pm. Admission: $8.00 ($5.00 for children 12 and under, seniors & students). Call 212-691-1303 or visit nycfiremuseum.org.

Victor Garber narrates “The Night Before Christmas,” at The Chelsea Symphony’s annual holiday concert. PHOTO BY WAI NG

Victor Garber narrates “The Night Before Christmas,” at The Chelsea Symphony’s annual holiday concert.
PHOTO BY WAI NG

CHELSEA SYMPHONY:  ANNUAL HOLIDAY CONCERT
The Chelsea Symphony has been expanding its geographic reach lately, with performances at Bargemusic, Symphony Space and Lincoln Center. But in early December, the vibrant, self-governing, 50-piece non-profit ensemble will be putting their own spin on that “home for the holidays” tradition, by setting their peripatetic sleigh down at St. Paul’s, for the group’s eighth annual holiday concert. Conducted by co-founder Yaniv Segal and co-Artistic Director Mark Seto, the seasonal offerings include Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Suite” and Leroy Anderson’s “Sleigh Ride.” The brass section takes center stage, with a performance of Schubert’s “Magnificat” arranged by (and featuring) trumpeter Warren Wernick. Following in the footsteps of marquee names including David Hyde Pierce, Charles Busch and Andrea Martin, special guest Victor Garber  (the complex man from “Argo” and “Alias”) will do the narration duties for resident composer Aaron Dai’s “The Night Before Christmas.”

Fri., Dec. 6 at 8pm. At St. Paul’s Church (315 W. 22nd St., btw. Eighth & Ninth Aves.). Free, with a suggested donation of $20 at the door. A reception and a silent auction, to benefit the orchestra, will follow the performance.

–  BY SCOTT STIfFLER

 

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