Join in! Tradition continues with a new look

NYC Community Media Publisher Jennifer Goodstein.

NYC Community Media Publisher Jennifer Goodstein.

BY JENNIFER GOODSTEIN  |  The more things change, the more they stay the same. A well-worn phrase, but one that rings true as we celebrate The Villager’s 80th anniversary. Combing through the newspaper’s archives, we see headlines from the past eight decades that could be ripped from today’s paper. The Villager has reported on world-class artists, colorful political figures, brilliant scholars, celebrated war heroes and ordinary citizens, including those who protest every few years against changes to Washington Square Park, city planning board decisions, schools, wars, rent increases…well, you get the picture. We have a rich history of serving a community committed to preserving the dynamic and unique landscape we simply call “The Village.”

In the age of Twitter, blogs, Facebook and other media — which deliver news in 100-calorie snack-pack portions — we enjoy the luxury of producing a weekly paper. Having the time to investigate stories and deliver fully fleshed-out reports makes The Villager stand out from the competition. In step with 80 years of tradition, we promise to continue delivering the thoughtful and thought-provoking news that is important to our readers — residents and businesses alike — both in print and online.

Our dedicated readers may have noticed our new look, logo and even a new (old) Scoopy. Our creative team and Editor in Chief Lincoln Anderson drew inspiration from the past to move us toward a more portable style that crosses print, online and mobile platforms. We want our content to look great regardless of how it is delivered to the reader. O.K., maybe the more things change, the more things change.

The Villager Web site and its social media are abuzz during the week between print editions as a virtual town square for readers to share their thoughts and opinions about the latest breaking news. If you have not checked out TheVillager.com, please do so. Feel free to join in the discussions, debates and (for all the Scoopy fans) gossip.

To our subscribers, thank you for supporting The Villager over the years. Your subscriptions help keep the paper alive. Your news tips, opinion pieces and talking points add color to the paper and help reflect the concerns of those living in the Village. We hope you enjoy the new look of the paper!

To new readers, welcome. You are living and working in one of the most vibrant neighborhoods in the world. If you want to keep up on local issues, news and goings-on, please look for our subscription ad on Page 63. Join in, become part of community. Yes, shameless promotion, but we know we are THAT good. Come on, join in, because being part of a neighborhood matters!

Goodstein is publisher, NYC Community Media (The Villager, Downtown Express, Gay City News, Chelsea Now and East Villager)

The Villager’s look has gone through changes before as seen in these front pages from summer 1989. In June, the Village Reform Democrats Club — formed as a breakaway “pro-Koch” faction of the Village Independent Democrats — refused to endorse Ed Koch for mayor, partly over the city’s plan to dock a prison barge, the Bibby Venture, at Pier 40, and also because they felt a “need for V.R.D.C. to better reflect the needs of its Village constituents.” Meanwhile, in July, police cleared the massive Tent City out of Tompkins Square Park.

The Villager’s look has gone through changes before as seen in these front pages from summer 1989. In June, the Village Reform Democrats Club — formed as a breakaway “pro-Koch” faction of the Village Independent Democrats — refused to endorse Ed Koch for mayor, partly over the city’s plan to dock a prison barge, the Bibby Venture, at Pier 40, and also because they felt a “need for V.R.D.C. to better reflect the needs of its Village constituents.” Meanwhile, in July, police cleared the massive Tent City out of Tompkins Square Park.

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