Just Do Art! Sept. 19, 2013

Artwork by Tamar Mogendorff Opening on Sept. 26, “Tweet” uses handheld tech to explores how birds communicate (hint: it’s not through 140-character messages).

Artwork by Tamar Mogendorff
Opening on Sept. 26, “Tweet” uses handheld tech to explores how birds communicate (hint: it’s not through 140-character messages).

“TWEET” EXHIBIT, AT THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF THE ARTS
The Children’s Museum of the Arts, which recently celebrated its quarter century of promoting self-expression and esteem, is gearing up for a busy fall. Their permanent collection includes work created by children from around the world — and visitors to the museum, who write haiku and hang it from the PoeTree. On Sept. 26, CMA will unveil a new exhibition (which runs through Jan. 26, 2014). “Tweet” takes you back to a time before 2006 — when tweeting was pretty much exclusively used to describe the chirp of a bird (not the 140-character message it’s become synonymous with). Through viewing artwork and using your own handheld technology, “Tweet” asks us to look around, enjoy nature and see the birds. In partnership with NYC Audubon, CMA will host a series of Bird Call Workshops — the first of which takes place on Sat., Sept. 28, from 12-3pm.

CMA’s after school program offers semester-long classes in a range of mediums for young artists ages 5-12. Taught by professional teaching artists, these classes are designed to teach and build upon age-appropriate art-making skills while encouraging creative and imaginative expression. Registration for the fall session (Sept. 23-Jan. 14, 2014) is now open. The fee is $500 ($450 for CMA members). For more info or to sign up, contact Valerie at vkharchenko@cmany.org.

CMA is located at 103 Charlton St. (btw. Greenwich & Hudson Sts.). Hours: Mon. & Wed., 12-5pm; Thurs. & Fri., 12-6pm; Sat. & Sun., 10am-5pm. Admission: $11 (Seniors and 0-12 months, free from 4-6pm). Thursdays are pay-as-you-wish. For info, call 212-274-0986 or visit cmany.org. Follow them at blog.cmany.org.

Dirt flies and mud is flung, in Jeffrey Cyphers Wright’s “Clubhouse on East 13th.”

Dirt flies and mud is flung, in Jeffrey Cyphers Wright’s “Clubhouse on East 13th.”

CLUBHOUSE ON EAST 13th
Seeking peaceful refuge in a public garden turns out to be no walk in the park — especially when a cadre of “self-important bullies thwart the democratic process and promote an odious policy of exclusion” by turning a supposed community-owned space into their own “private backyard.” Based on his interpretation of actual events at the Dias y Flores Community Garden on East 13th Street, Jeffrey Cyphers Wright’s humorous morality play pokes fun at the totem pole pecking order and (trumped up?) charges that muddy a patch of dirt meant to serve as an urban oasis. Jane LeCroy, Eve Packer, Ronnie Norpel, Debra Jenks, Hillary Keel, Anders Goldfarb and Serge Velez star in the play, which will be presented in conjunction with a show of artwork by Gahae Park (who fabricates her formalist “drawings” with thousands of folded X-Acto knife cuts and small blocks of brilliant color).

Free. Sat., Sept. 28, at 2pm. At Tompkins Square Library Gallery (331 E. 10th St., btw. Aves. A & B). Visit jeffreycypherswright.com.

LOCOMBIA, AN UNEMPLOYED AMERICAN ARTIST’S GUIDE  TO SURVIVING BOGATA
Is it better to be poor in a third world country, or broke in the good old USA? Culture shock, and a professional calling that pretty much requires a vow of poverty, are both played for laughs — in playwright J. Anthony Roman’s only slightly fictional fish out of water tale. Based on the starving artist’s often frantic and sometimes fantastic journey to South America, “Locombia” fuses poetry, projections and traditional Colombian music (performed live, by Gaitas y Tambores).

Thurs., Sept. 26 through Sat., Sept. 28, at 8pm. At Speyer Hall at University Settlement (184 Eldridge St., btw. Rivington & Delancey Sts.). For tickets ($18), call 800-838-3006 or visit brownpapertickets.com. Also visit janthonyroman.com.

Photo by Junbug A struggling artist is stuck in a strange land, in “Locombia.”

Photo by Junbug
A struggling artist is stuck in a strange land, in “Locombia.”

SUBCULTURE PIANO FEST
After a soft launch this spring, and a summer’s worth of activity (including gigs from Macy Gray, Canon Logic and Aziz Ansari), the music-centric venue founded by brothers Marc and Steven Kaplan had a raucous launch party on September 16. One day later, SubCulture began its official existence with night #1 of a 15-day, 15-performance piano festival. Dedicated to showcasing multiple genres — and shining a spotlight on the sonic versatility that can be coaxed out of 88 keys — a diverse assembly of emerging and established artists will perform in unique setup (such as ensemble players who’ll perform solo or in a duo). The roster of talent includes award-winning composer Gregg Kallor (7:30pm on 9/26, representing the Classical series), Jazz Series performers Matthew Shipp (7:30 & 10pm on 9/21) and Taylor Eigsti (7:30pm on 9/24) and Pop/Rock Series acts Grayson Hugh (7:30pm on 9/23) and ELEW (7:30pm on Oct. 1).

Photo courtesy of the artist & SubCulture Matthew Shipp performs, as part of SubCulture’s Piano Fest (7:30 & 10pm on Sat., Sept. 21).

Photo courtesy of the artist & SubCulture
Matthew Shipp performs, as part of SubCulture’s Piano Fest (7:30 & 10pm on Sat., Sept. 21).

The SubCulture Piano Fest runs through Oct. 1, at SubCulture (in the downstairs space of the Bleecker Street Theater — 45 Bleecker St., btw. Bowery & Lafayette). Ticket prices vary from show to show; $15-$40. Visit subculturenewyork.com. Facebook: facebook.com/subculturenewyork. Twitter: twitter.com/subculture_nyc.

Photo source: The Illustrated London news There will be blood: Justin Ferate lectures on the New York Draft Riots — Sept. 26, at the Merchant’s House Museum.

Photo source: The Illustrated London news
There will be blood: Justin Ferate lectures on the New York Draft Riots — Sept. 26, at the Merchant’s House Museum.

THE REAL GANGS OF NEW YORK
The Merchant’s House Museum, New York City’s only family home preserved intact from the mid-19th century, has been carving out a nice little niche-within-a-niche lately — with their “Lifeways” lecture series, in which the home’s 1832 landmark building and collection of Tredwell family belongings provides inspiration for insightful talks on American decorative arts, architecture, preservation and New York City history. On September 26, find out how social pressures and ill-advised public policies led to a bloody confrontation in the streets — as urban historian Justin Ferate’s lecture marks the 150th anniversary of the New York Draft Riots.

Thurs., Sept. 26, at 6:30pm. At the Merchant’s House Museum (29 E. Fourth St., btw. Lafayette & Bowery Sts.). Admission: $15 (MHM members, free). Limited seats — reservations strongly encouraged. Call 212-777-1089 or visit merchantshouse.org/calendar. Follow: facebook.com/merchantshouse and, on Twitter: @merchantshouse. Regular Museum hours, during which you can take a self-guided tour of the house, are 12-5pm, Thurs.-Mon. (admission is $10 general, $5 for students/seniors).

–  BY SCOTT STIFFLER

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One Response to Just Do Art! Sept. 19, 2013

  1. I wanna see just how funny Clubhouse on East 13th can be, considering the real story of garden bullying. Five people kicked out of that garden so and still no one is allowed to join. Thanks for plugging this, East Villager!

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