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Back to their roots: Amore Opera’s “La Bohème” revisits the company’s inaugural season production.

Back to their roots: Amore Opera’s “La Bohème” revisits the company’s inaugural season production.

AMORE OPERA’S “La Bohème”
Amore Opera revisits the production that marked its inaugural season — Puccini’s timeless masterpiece, “La Bohème.” Set in the 1840s, the opera in four acts (which had a little something to do with inspiring a little Broadway smash called “Rent”) concerns a group of bohemians living in the Latin Quarter of Paris — specifically, the tragic arc of two young lovers. Directed by Nathan Hull and conducted by Gregory Ortega, Amore’s “La Bohème” is fully staged (with full orchestra) and presented in its original Italian (with subtitles). An abbreviated, 90-minute version is also offered, as part of Amore’s “Opera-in-Brief” series (geared towards young audiences and families). The New Year’s Eve performance of the full production also functions as the company’s annual fundraiser — and includes hors d’oeuvres, dinner between acts, a champagne toast at midnight and a special post-midnight concert.

Through Jan. 6, at the Connelly Theater (220 E. 4th St., btw. Aves. A & B). Tickets are $40, $30 for students/seniors. The New Year’s Eve Gala is $125. All tickets for the Opera-in-Briefs are $15. To purchase, visit amoreopera.org or call 888-811-4111. “La Bohème” plays Sat., Dec. 29 at 7:30pm and Sun., Dec. 30 at 3:30pm. The New Year’s Eve Dinner Gala/performance is Mon., Dec. 31, 7:30pm. Additional performances at 7:30pm, Wed, Jan. 2-Sat., Jan. 5 and on Sun., Jan. 6 at 2:30pm. “La Bohème Opera-in-Brief” plays Sat., Dec. 29 at 2:30pm and Sat., Jan. 5 at 2:30pm. 

—Scott Stiffler

The Skyscraper Museum’s “Urban Fabric” exhibition is on view through Feb. 17.  Photo courtesy of The Skyscraper Museum (copyright: ILGWU Collection, Cornell University Archive

The Skyscraper Museum’s “Urban Fabric” exhibition is on view through Feb. 17. Photo courtesy of The Skyscraper Museum (copyright: ILGWU Collection, Cornell University Archive

URBAN FABRIC: BUILDING NEW YORK’s  GARMENT DISTRICT
This exhibition focuses on New York’s Garment District, which once housed the largest concentration of skyscraper factories in the world. Comprising about eighteen city blocks, ranging from 35th to 41st Streets and from Seventh to Ninth Avenues, it was home to over 100,000 manufacturing workers — including needle-trade workers, patternmakers, cutters, sewers, pressers and finishers, as well as the executives, designers and models. Nearly 75 percent of all women’s and children’s apparel in the United States were produced in this area. The exhibition provides insight into this district’s rapid development, which occurred almost entirely within the boom decade of the 1920s. Through Feb. 17. At The Skyscraper Museum (39 Battery Place). Call 212-968-1961 or skyscraper.org.

Installation view of “El Anatsui: Pot of Wisdom.”  Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

Installation view of “El Anatsui: Pot of Wisdom.” Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

El Anatsui: Pot of Wisdom
Born in 1944, the Ghanaian sculptor has spent much of his career in Nigeria. While in the past, some of his preferred materials have included clay and wood, his most recent installations incorporate a wide range of found materials. His best-known works are monumental wall sculptures that are made of thousands of discarded bottle tops. The latter are assembled into elegantly shimmering patterns, which generate a unique sense of color and movement.

As all of El Anatsui’s works pay homage to traditional African art and craft, one can expect another interesting display of a vocabulary and imagination both foreign and otherworldly.

Through Jan. 19. At Jack Shainman Gallery (513 W. 20th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). The gallery will be open by appointment from Dec. 24 through Jan. 2. Call 212-645-1701 or visit jackshainman.com.

—Stephanie Buhmann

 

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